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NEW REPORT: NO SUCCESS FOR REDD+ WITHOUT UNDERSTANDING POTENTIAL IMPACTS ON FOREST BIODIVERSITY AND PEOPLE

First comprehensive scientific assessment shows that conserving biodiversity and sustaining livelihoods are essential components for achieving climate change mitigation goals in the long run
.

Vienna (16 November, 2012) – The world's rapidly dwindling forests should be valued as more than just "carbon warehouses" to mitigate climate change, according to a new report released today from the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO), the world's largest network of forest scientists. In fact, biodiversity is found to be a critical determinant of a forest's ability to absorb greenhouse gases. The assessment also stresses that accounting for those who live in or near forests when implementing REDD+ increases the likelihood of achieving carbon and biodiversity goals.

EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE UNTIL 00:01 GMT ON 16 NOVEMBER, 2012

 

MEDIA CONTACTS


Gerda Wolfrum: + 43 1 877 01 51 17 or wolfrum(at)iufro.org
Dan Klotz: +1 301-280-5756 or dklotz(at)burnesscommunications.com

MATERIALS


1.  Press Release

[English (embargoed) – PDF, 159 KB]


2. Full Report

Understanding Relationships between Biodiversity, Carbon, Forests and People:
The Key to Achieving REDD+ Objectives

3. Policy Brief

REDD+, Biodiversity and People: Opportunities and Risks

4. Discussion Forum at Forest Day 6

Forest Day 6, afternoon session on 2 December, 1:30-2:30 pm:
REDD+, biodiversity and people: Opportunities and risks
http://www.forestsclimatechange.org/events/forest-day/forest-day-6/discussion-forums/redd-biodiversity-and-people-opportunities-and-risks.html

5 . Photos

 

Uapaca sp., Parc National de l’Ivindo, Gabon.
Photo: Robert Nasi

 

Ethiopian montane forest with tree ferns.
Photo: Christine B. Schmitt

 

Madagascar montane forest.
Photo: Christine B. Schmitt

 

Mangrove forest. Marajó, Brazil.
Photo: Christine B. Schmitt

 

Toucans are important seed dispersers. Toco toucan (Ramphastos toco) in
Brazil's Atlantic Forest.
Photo: PJ Stephenson

 

Non-timber forest products. Badaling, China.
Photo: Alexander Buck

 

Black-headed squirrel monkey (Samiri vanzlinii), endemic to the Mamirauá
State Sustainable Development Reserve.
Photo: PJ Stephenson

 

Returning from the buffer zone plantation with pine wood, animal fodder
and bedding. Nyungwe National Park, Rwanda.
Photo: Adrian Martin



Participation in social impact monitoring, REDD+ Pilot project, Kilwa, Tanzania.
Photo: Adrian Martin

 

FSC certified Mpingo (Dalbergia melanoxylon), Kilwa, Tanzania.
Photo: Adrian Martin

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